PRETOMA: Looking after turtles in Costa Rica

The Programa Restauracion de Tortugas Marinas (PRETOMA) has been looking after turtles in Costa Rica for over a decade. The organisation was setup in 1996 to assist with the yearly nesting of turtles on some of Costa Rica’s beaches. The turtles are diminishing in numbers and PRETOMA offers placements where volunteers look after and care for injured turtles and patrol the beaches when the turtles hatch.

Ingrid Yanez, project co-ordinator, feels that PRETOMA and the volunteers get a lot out of the placement.

She said: “The turtles are the big winners, they get protection from poaching and through work undertaken by volunteers where they support scientists then we get to find out more information about the species.

“Overall the volunteers give the turtles a better chance at survival.

“For the volunters, they get to help out on a conservation project that can save a species, it will educate them, they will grow themselves as people.”

The money that volunteers pay to travel to Costa Rica and take part in the conservation is important as it provides funding for the project, and the money the volunteers bring also helps sustain the local community.

Ingrid Yanez feels that the influx of volunteers to the project has been a good thing.

She said: “Personally I’ve made some great friends with the people who have come to volunteer, we’ve improved the prospects for the turtle population and it has also helped the local economy.”

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Explore posts in the same categories: Volunteer organisations

One Comment on “PRETOMA: Looking after turtles in Costa Rica”

  1. Andy Bystrom Says:

    As communications director for Pretoma, I would like to add that sea turtle conservation projects depend on volunteers. Without them, the projects are no financially sustainable (both for the community and the sponsor organization). Thank you for supporting these important endeavors. There is a lot more information on marine conservation efforts at the Costa Rican Conservation Network’s blog: http://costaricanconservationnetwork.wordpress.com/


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